Open the ttx with a text editor like notepad or wordpad. In the second line Change: DataType="PlugInConverted" To: DataType="XML" When the file is opened, Tageditor will prompt for a DTD/INI file -- choose anything (default html). After Translation, restore the original DataType attribute.

translate SDLXLIFF files in other tools

Prepare files in SDL Studio

  1. Open the SDL Studio project.
  2. (Optional?) Copy source to target (or pretranslate files)
    1. Choose the Files view, select the source language in the top left corner.
    2. Then select the file, right-click on it and choose Batch tasks / Copy to Target Languages.
  3. Open the file for translation and save it to make sure that it is really prepared.
  4. Close the SDL Studio project.

Move files and translate them with MemoQ or DVX

  1. Go to the folder with the target files in the Studio project structure. It can look like: c:\username\My documents\Studio 2011\Projects\My Project\fr-FR\myfile.sdlxliff.
  2. Move the SDLXLIFF file to another location and translate it in memoQ or DVX or another tool
  3. Export your translation, and move the exported file to the original target SDL Studio folder.

Check and process file in SDL Studio

  1. Open the SLDXLIFF file in your Studio project and check that everything is OK.
  2. You now have to change segment status to "translated":
    1. Press the Shift key and click in the first row in the segment number column, then click in the last row of the same column without releasing the Shift key.
    2. Keep the cursor in the segment number column, right-click and choose Change segment status / Translated.

Update your SDL Studio memory (optional)

  1. Choose the "Translation Memories" view.
  2. Select the translation memory that you want to update.
  3. Right-click and choose "Import" and follow the wizard.
原因:由于 trados 2007(7.x) 和 2008(8.x) 都不支持 Encoding 为 UTF-8 格式(注意,与 Charset 没有关系) 的 html 文件。如果直接将 utf-8 的 html 拖进 tageditor,tageditor 会强制将 html 文件转换成 ansi 编码格式,并在文件头部留下 utf-8 的 BOM (Byte Order Mark,中文系统下会显示为乱码)。另外,由于我们工作的时候采用的是简体中文系统,系统默认的字符集是 GB2312,显示时将会把 ansi 编码格式的一些特殊字符转换成中文(也就是我们看到的乱码)。 解决方法:将 HTML 文件的 Encoding 从 utf-8 转为 unicode (即 utf-16),之后再用 trados tageditor 打开&翻译。翻译完成后,再把最终的 html 文件的 encoding 转回 utf-8。不要告诉我你连 encoding 转换都不会。:-) Is editing the same thing as proofreading? Not exactly. Although many people use the terms interchangeably, editing and proofreading are two different stages of the revision process. Both demand close and careful reading, but they focus on different aspects of the writing and employ different techniques. Some tips that apply to both editing and proofreading Editing Editing is what you begin doing as soon as you finish your first draft. You reread your draft to see, for example, whether the paper is well-organized, the transitions between paragraphs are smooth, and your evidence really backs up your argument. You can edit on several levels: Content Have you done everything the assignment requires? Are the claims you make accurate? If it is required to do so, does your paper make an argument? Is the argument complete? Are all of your claims consistent? Have you supported each point with adequate evidence? Is all of the information in your paper relevant to the assignment and/or your overall writing goal? Overall structure Does your paper have an appropriate introduction and conclusion? Is your thesis clearly stated in your introduction? Is it clear how each paragraph in the body of your paper is related to your thesis? Are the paragraphs arranged in a logical sequence? Have you made clear transitions between paragraphs? One way to check the structure of your paper is to make an outline of the paper after you have written the first draft. Structure within paragraphs Does each paragraph have a clear topic sentence? Does each paragraph stick to one main idea? Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs? Clarity Have you defined any important terms that might be unclear to your reader? Is the meaning of each sentence clear? (One way to answer this question is to read your paper one sentence at a time, starting at the end and working backwards so that you will not unconsciously fill in content from previous sentences.) Is it clear what each pronoun (he, she, it, they, which, who, this, etc.) refers to? Have you chosen the proper words to express your ideas? Avoid using words you find in the thesaurus that aren't part of your normal vocabulary; you may misuse them. Style Have you used an appropriate tone (formal, informal, persuasive, etc.)? Is your use of gendered language (masculine and feminine pronouns like "he" or "she," words like "fireman" that contain "man," and words that some people incorrectly assume apply to only one gender—for example, some people assume "nurse" must refer to a woman) appropriate? Have you varied the length and structure of your sentences? Do you tends to use the passive voice too often? Does your writing contain a lot of unnecessary phrases like "there is," "there are," "due to the fact that," etc.? Do you repeat a strong word (for example, a vivid main verb) unnecessarily? Citations Have you appropriately cited quotes, paraphrases, and ideas you got from sources? Are your citations in the correct format? As you edit at all of these levels, you will usually make significant revisions to the content and wording of your paper. Keep an eye out for patterns of error; knowing what kinds of problems you tend to have will be helpful, especially if you are editing a large document like a thesis or dissertation. Once you have identified a pattern, you can develop techniques for spotting and correcting future instances of that pattern. For example, if you notice that you often discuss several distinct topics in each paragraph, you can go through your paper and underline the key words in each paragraph, then break the paragraphs up so that each one focuses on just one main idea. Proofreading Proofreading is the final stage of the editing process, focusing on surface errors such as misspellings and mistakes in grammar and punctuation. You should proofread only after you have finished all of your other editing revisions. Why proofread? It's the content that really matters, right? Content is important. But like it or not, the way a paper looks affects the way others judge it. When you've worked hard to develop and present your ideas, you don't want careless errors distracting your reader from what you have to say. It's worth paying attention to the details that help you to make a good impression. Most people devote only a few minutes to proofreading, hoping to catch any glaring errors that jump out from the page. But a quick and cursory reading, especially after you've been working long and hard on a paper, usually misses a lot. It's better to work with a definite plan that helps you to search systematically for specific kinds of errors. Sure, this takes a little extra time, but it pays off in the end. If you know that you have an effective way to catch errors when the paper is almost finished, you can worry less about editing while you are writing your first drafts. This makes the entire writing proccess more efficient. Try to keep the editing and proofreading processes separate. When you are editing an early draft, you don't want to be bothered with thinking about punctuation, grammar, and spelling. If your worrying about the spelling of a word or the placement of a comma, you're not focusing on the more important task of developing and connecting ideas. The proofreading process You probably already use some of the strategies discussed below. Experiment with different tactics until you find a system that works well for you. The important thing is to make the process systematic and focused so that you catch as many errors as possible in the least amount of time. 

Editing and Proofreading

Is editing the same thing as proofreading?

Not exactly. Although many people use the terms interchangeably, editing and proofreading are two different stages of the revision process. Both demand close and careful reading, but they focus on different aspects of the writing and employ different techniques.

Some tips that apply to both editing and proofreading

  • Get some distance from the text! It's hard to edit or proofread a paper that you've just finished writing—it's still to familiar, and you tend to skip over a lot of errors. Put the paper aside for a few hours, days, or weeks. Go for a run. Take a trip to the beach. Clear your head of what you've written so you can take a fresh look at the paper and see what is really on the page. Better yet, give the paper to a friend—you can't get much more distance than that. Someone who is reading the paper for the first time, comes to it with completely fresh eyes.

  • Decide what medium lets you proofread most carefully. Some people like to work right at the computer, while others like to sit back with a printed copy that they can mark up as they read.

  • Try changing the look of your document. Altering the size, spacing, color, or style of the text may trick your brain into thinking it's seeing an unfamiliar document, and that can help you get a different perspective on what you've written.

  • Find a quiet place to work. Don't try to do your proofreading in front of the TV or while you're chugging away on the treadmill. Find a place where you can concentrate and avoid distractions.

  • If possible, do your editing and proofreading in several short blocks of time, rather than all at once—otherwise, your concentration is likely to wane.

  • If you're short on time, you may wish to prioritize your editing and proofreading tasks to be sure that the most important ones are completed.

Editing

Editing is what you begin doing as soon as you finish your first draft. You reread your draft to see, for example, whether the paper is well-organized, the transitions between paragraphs are smooth, and your evidence really backs up your argument. You can edit on several levels:

Content

Have you done everything the assignment requires? Are the claims you make accurate? If it is required to do so, does your paper make an argument? Is the argument complete? Are all of your claims consistent? Have you supported each point with adequate evidence? Is all of the information in your paper relevant to the assignment and/or your overall writing goal?

Overall structure

Does your paper have an appropriate introduction and conclusion? Is your thesis clearly stated in your introduction? Is it clear how each paragraph in the body of your paper is related to your thesis? Are the paragraphs arranged in a logical sequence? Have you made clear transitions between paragraphs? One way to check the structure of your paper is to make an outline of the paper after you have written the first draft.

Structure within paragraphs

Does each paragraph have a clear topic sentence? Does each paragraph stick to one main idea? Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs?

Clarity

Have you defined any important terms that might be unclear to your reader? Is the meaning of each sentence clear? (One way to answer this question is to read your paper one sentence at a time, starting at the end and working backwards so that you will not unconsciously fill in content from previous sentences.) Is it clear what each pronoun (he, she, it, they, which, who, this, etc.) refers to? Have you chosen the proper words to express your ideas? Avoid using words you find in the thesaurus that aren't part of your normal vocabulary; you may misuse them.

Style

Have you used an appropriate tone (formal, informal, persuasive, etc.)? Is your use of gendered language (masculine and feminine pronouns like "he" or "she," words like "fireman" that contain "man," and words that some people incorrectly assume apply to only one gender—for example, some people assume "nurse" must refer to a woman) appropriate? Have you varied the length and structure of your sentences? Do you tends to use the passive voice too often? Does your writing contain a lot of unnecessary phrases like "there is," "there are," "due to the fact that," etc.? Do you repeat a strong word (for example, a vivid main verb) unnecessarily?

Citations

Have you appropriately cited quotes, paraphrases, and ideas you got from sources? Are your citations in the correct format?

As you edit at all of these levels, you will usually make significant revisions to the content and wording of your paper. Keep an eye out for patterns of error; knowing what kinds of problems you tend to have will be helpful, especially if you are editing a large document like a thesis or dissertation. Once you have identified a pattern, you can develop techniques for spotting and correcting future instances of that pattern. For example, if you notice that you often discuss several distinct topics in each paragraph, you can go through your paper and underline the key words in each paragraph, then break the paragraphs up so that each one focuses on just one main idea.

Proofreading

Proofreading is the final stage of the editing process, focusing on surface errors such as misspellings and mistakes in grammar and punctuation. You should proofread only after you have finished all of your other editing revisions.

Why proofread? It's the content that really matters, right?

Content is important. But like it or not, the way a paper looks affects the way others judge it. When you've worked hard to develop and present your ideas, you don't want careless errors distracting your reader from what you have to say. It's worth paying attention to the details that help you to make a good impression.

Most people devote only a few minutes to proofreading, hoping to catch any glaring errors that jump out from the page. But a quick and cursory reading, especially after you've been working long and hard on a paper, usually misses a lot. It's better to work with a definite plan that helps you to search systematically for specific kinds of errors.

Sure, this takes a little extra time, but it pays off in the end. If you know that you have an effective way to catch errors when the paper is almost finished, you can worry less about editing while you are writing your first drafts. This makes the entire writing proccess more efficient.

Try to keep the editing and proofreading processes separate. When you are editing an early draft, you don't want to be bothered with thinking about punctuation, grammar, and spelling. If your worrying about the spelling of a word or the placement of a comma, you're not focusing on the more important task of developing and connecting ideas.

The proofreading process

You probably already use some of the strategies discussed below. Experiment with different tactics until you find a system that works well for you. The important thing is to make the process systematic and focused so that you catch as many errors as possible in the least amount of time.

· Don't rely entirely on spelling checkers. These can be useful tools but they are far from foolproof. Spell checkers have a limited dictionary, so some words that show up as misspelled may really just not be in their memory. In addition, spell checkers will not catch misspellings that form another valid word. For example, if you type "your" instead of "you're," "to" instead of "too," or "there" instead of "their," the spell checker won't catch the error.

· Grammar checkers can be even more problematic. These programs work with a limited number of rules, so they can't identify every error and often make mistakes. They also fail to give thorough explanations to help you understand why a sentence should be revised. You may want to use a grammar checker to help you identify potential run-on sentences or too-frequent use of the passive voice, but you need to be able to evaluate the feedback it provides.

· Proofread for only one kind of error at a time. If you try to identify and revise too many things at once, you risk losing focus, and your proofreading will be less effective. It's easier to catch grammar errors if you aren't checking punctuation and spelling at the same time. In addition, some of the techniques that work well for spotting one kind of mistake won't catch others.

· Read slow, and read every word. Try reading out loud, which forces you to say each word and also lets you hear how the words sound together. When you read silently or too quickly, you may skip over errors or make unconscious corrections.

· Separate the text into individual sentences. This is another technique to help you to read every sentence carefully. Simply press the return key after every period so that every line begins a new sentence. Then read each sentence separately, looking for grammar, punctuation, or spelling errors. If you're working with a printed copy, try using an opaque object like a ruler or a piece of paper to isolate the line you're working on.

· Circle every punctuation mark. This forces you to look at each one. As you circle, ask yourself if the punctuation is correct.

· Read the paper backwards. This technique is helpful for checking spelling. Start with the last word on the last page and work your way back to the beginning, reading each word separately. Because content, punctuation, and grammar won't make any sense, your focus will be entirely on the spelling of each word. You can also read backwards sentence by sentence to check grammar; this will help you avoid becoming distracted by content issues.

· Proofreading is a learning process. You're not just looking for errors that you recognize; you're also learning to recognize and correct new errors. This is where handbooks and dictionaries come in. Keep the ones you find helpful close at hand as you proofread.

· Ignorance may be bliss, but it won't make you a better proofreader. You'll often find things that don't seem quite right to you, but you may not be quite sure what's wrong either. A word looks like it might be misspelled, but the spell checker didn't catch it. You think you need a comma between two words, but you're not sure why. Should you use "that" instead of "which"? If you're not sure about something, look it up.

· The proofreading process becomes more efficient as you develop and practice a systematic strategy. You'll learn to identify the specific areas of your own writing that need careful attention, and knowing that you have a sound method for finding errors will help you to focus more on developing your ideas while you are drafting the paper.

When I first saw a link to this CAT Tool on Internet, I hesitated before clicking on it. Could yet another translation software application make any difference to my daily work? Nevertheless, I was pleasantly surprised by what I saw when I did click on the link. Ppt.Helper is a small yet effective tool to help you translate PowerPoint presentations. I have been dealing with PowerPoint ever since I started translating: the mid 1990s. As a computer user, I can clearly see its advantages: it is highly visual, intuitive and handles a wide variety of media formats. As a translator, however, the very fact that it is visual and not text-based means that special techniques and software applications must be applied to produce accurate and profitable translations. Before I continue with the merits of ppt.helper, I would like to give the reader a brief history of my bittersweet relationship with PowerPoint files. In the early days of translating by computer, coping with PowerPoint files was a real headache because it forced the translator to perform several steps simultaneously. Whenever more than a couple of steps are performed at the same time, the quality of the finished product invariably suffers. Working “manually" with PowerPoint entailed: creating a copy of the source file, renaming it and overwriting the source text with the target text. Though seemingly straightforward, this technique has its share of pitfalls: you can accidentally add or omit target text, erase source text before overwriting it with the target text and erase original formatting. Furthermore, proofreading is made more laborious because you are forced to open the source file and compare the translation to it while attempting to ignore the distractions associated with PowerPoint’s highly visual display. As can be gathered from this description, there are at least three opportunities for committing a mistake that will most likely be brought to your attention after the project manager has gone over it. Then, sometime after the year Two Thousand, I came upon CAT Tools. The first standalone one I worked with was Deja Vu. It usually did a god job with PowerPoint files. However, on occasion, there would be that one belligerent PowerPoint file that would refuse to export. It turned out that I had misplaced a code (those pesky numbers between brackets: {151}). Other times, I reached the “PowerPoint export impasse” because there were many image files and Deja Vu decided to be altogether uncooperative. (Yes, I know, there is always a workaround. Nevertheless, I would rather just “work” without the “around”). Recently, I switched over to SDLX. I like the way it handles PowerPoint files better than I do Deja Vu. However, SDLX has its catch too: if you want to export PPT files, you have to make sure the SDLX ITD file is in the same folder as the source file. Otherwise, nothing happens. I did not know about this for quite some time and was copying the target text from the ITD file and pasting it into the target PPT file. What a mess! (Yes, of course, shame on me for not posting a question in a forum or going back to the help file.) Nevertheless, I believe that software should be intuitive and make work less complicated instead of complicating the already busy translator with technical details. This brings me back to ppt.helper. It is both simple to use and rich in functionalities. I was using it within five minutes without even glancing at the help file (which, by the way, is very well written and quite explanatory). Among ppt.helper’s main features are: its own translation memory, search, separate source and target Windows, built-in preview, supports Unicode compatible with SDL Trados, updated version, compatibility with Wordfast, it includes the Concordance search in TM, and allows converting to the standard format for localization (*.tmx). In fact, I found myself wondering how I had managed to translate PowerPoint files before this program. There are no codes (thank God!) and no exporting. That means that you can open the target PPT file from within ppt.helper at any time with no extra steps. It is also nice to have an application that concentrates on one type of file. The program is pleasantly lightweight, which means that you can save your RAM for other programs you might have open simultaneously. I could go on with my PowerPoint translating history, but I would rather you took the time to try out ppt.helper yourself. If you decide to buy it, you will find that it will most likely be less expensive than the next PPT file you are assigned. source:http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/1132/1/Ppt.Helper---A-Real-Help%21

It seems there is no direct way to translate TTK in DVX. I think here is a workaround for this.

First, export the project as a dictionary.
Then, translate the dictionary in DVX.
Third, translate the ttk with the translated dictionary attached.

Dear all,

During the last few days we have been carefully monitoring your comments and feedback, and we would like to apologise for the issues we have caused you surrounding our licensing and processes. To try and rectify this effectively we have implemented some immediate changes:

1) ON LICENSING
As you know, as part of the upgrade process, we asked you to return your old license first. After the licenses were returned you should have received your SDL Trados Studio 2009 license and a time-limited license of SDL Trados 2007 Suite. This policy has now been changed. Once you have returned your licenses we will now add to your account a permanent and unlimited license of SDL Trados 2007 Suite as well as a permanent license of SDL Trados Studio 2009.

a. Anyone making a new purchase, and anyone who has not yet activated or returned their license, will find a permanent SDL Trados 2007 Suite license available to them as soon as they complete the upgrade process.

b. People who have already activated their new Studio license will also be able to replace the temporary license of SDL Trados 2007 Suite, with a permanent one.

It is already possible to deactivate / reactivate licenses and on reactivation they will become permanent. More detailed instructions will follow from our support team in due course.

We originally implemented the changes to streamline our account and licensing system, to protect our Intellectual property, prevent license theft and ensure we can continue to more easily improve our licensing and activation system. This is a normal practice followed by most software companies which upon upgrade purchases will not allow two simultaneous licenses and versions to run in parallel. However our execution and communication was less than brilliant. We hope that with this change, you will now be able to move forward and enjoy the new features in SDL Trados Studio 2009.

2) ON THE PROCESS
We realize that the process of returning licenses appeared cumbersome and complicated. Our systems and communication were not clear and there has been confusion created by our new process.

We have already introduced improvements to our online account system that should make the process clearer. We will continue to improve the process and over the next few days you will see more improvements coming up. We are also introducing better ways of getting immediate support for licensing and activation, this will become evident in due course and details will be provided to this forum.

3) ON ANY OTHER QUESTIONS
There have been many posts in the last few days, mostly around licensing. There have also been some on other subjects that are probably lost in the numerous threads that have developed. Whilst we have been enhancing all the normal places to look, Support Centre, talisma.sdl.com, faq's on translationzone.com, we will also pay particular attention to this forum and try to help out a little more than normal.

For all the inconvenience we can only apologise, and hope that with the changes introduced you will be able to get up and running on the new software much more easily, and start to enjoy the new SDL Trados Studio 2009.

To summarise, everyone who upgrades or buys a new license of SDL Trados Studio 2009 will have in their account permanent SDL Trados 2007 Suite licenses and we will continue to improve the process to upgrade to the latest version.

We do apologise for all the inconvenience and we thank you very much for your feedback. We are continously trying to improve the ways in which we can gather your feedback and this forum has been particularly helpful in this regard. The feedback, big or small, good or bad, is all read and we do take it into account in the way we work and in what we offer you.

Humbly,
Paul Filkin
on behalf of
SDL Trados Technologies